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Reince Priebus Elected Chairman of the Republican National Committee

Newly elected RNC Chairman Reince Priebus

Bookmark and Share    On the seventh ballot Reince Priebus (pronounced /raɪns ˈpriːbəs/),  the Chairman of the Wisconsin Republican Party was elected chairman of the Republican National Committee.

Priebus went in to the race as a frontrunner and as a favorite of the grassroots.  He was also supported by Republican activist, prolific fundraiser and lobyist, Henry Barbour, nephew of Mississippi Governor Haley Barbour.

On the final ballot Priebus garnered 97 votes to Saul Anuzis’s 43 and Maria Cino’s 28.

85 votes are needed to win.

In his acceptance speech, Priebus urged all of the Republican National Committee to come together and promised to work with everyone. “We all recognize that there is a steep still ahead and the only way to face it is to work together” said Priebus

He reminded delegates that each of them are the employees of the Republican voters and that it will be their responsibility to restructure financial operations, hiring top notch staff and beating President Obama in 2012.  Priebus also stated that he wanted to shape the GOP into a truly conservative Party that elected conservative candidates.

Some suggest that being supported by the nephew of the influential Mississippi Governor and former RNC Chairman Haley Barbour,  this is a signal that Governor Barbour is on track to winning the G.O.P.’s presidential nomination.

But aside from rumors of  Haley Barbour’s influence in this election for Chairman, Reince Prebius in his own right came to the position of Wisconsin State Party Chairman in 2007 and by 2010 he took a considerably blue state and helped win a U.S. Senate from Democrat stalwart Russ Feingold, took back the historically Democrat seat of powerful Congressman David Obey as well as other House seats and helped capture the statehouse with Republican Scott Walker.

The election of Reince Preibus marks the beginning of a new page for the Republican National Committee after some of its most historic electoral gains in history. While Mike Steele was energizing force that had a part in those election victories, he did little to insure that the RNC developed a strong and reliable fundraising operation and left the RNC with a large debt. Steele was also criticized for not reinforcing an effective organizational strategy for strengthening the grassroots of the Party.

More About Reince Priebus:

Priebus was born and raised in Kenosha, Wisconsin and graduated from George Nelson Tremper High School in 1990. He obtained a bachelor’s degree in Political Science and English in 1994 from University of Wisconsin–Whitewater (where he was student body president), worked in the Wisconsin Legislature for a year, and then went to law school, receiving a law degree from University of Miami School of Law in 1998.  During his time there, he interned for the NAACP legal defense fund in Los Angeles.  In 1998, he joined the law firm of Michael Best & Friedrich LLP in Milwaukee.

In 2004, in his first bid for public office, Priebus unsuccessfully challenged incumbent Robert Wirch for a seat in the Wisconsin Senate, where Priebus reportedly spent $384,486 to Wirch’s $182,595.

Priebus was elected state GOP party chair in 2007,  the youngest person ever elected to that position.  In 2009, he became general counsel of the RNC under chairman Michael Steele.

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MIKE STEELE TO THE RESCUE

antsteele_rnc_blog_fwa_20090130173241Bookmark and Share     Congratulations to Maryland’s former Lieutenant Governor Mike Steele.

On Friday on the sixth ballot, after a long, hard and well fought fight, he captured enough votes to become the next Chairman of the Republican National Committee.

Although, I endorsed Ohio’s Ken Blackwell for the position, there was nothing that made me object to Mike Steele.

 Since he held office in Maryland, I have been an admirer and fan of his work. For a long time now he has been an articulate defender of Republican ideology who also calls it like he sees it. He had no problem pointing out Republican wrongdoing.

So not only do I not have a problem with Steele, I am excited by his stewardship of our party.

The only reason I preferred Blackwell to Steele was the fact that Blackwell was Ohio’s Secretary of State and as a former Secretary of State I felt that his knowledge with the running of elections could give us an edge in election operations.

That aside, Steele is just as good as Blackwell and in some ways may be even better.  One example is Steele as a speaker.  In that area Mike Steele is a great communicator who has the ability to appeal to our better senses.

With Steele at the helm, our partyhas a good chance to rebuild.  And rebuilding is what we must do.

So I am not only pleased with the RNC election results, I am pumped by Steele’s victory and all that he brings to the table.

Mike Steele is a very likeable guy and an accomplished one too.  Born on Andrews Air Force Base, Mike Steele grew up in the suburbs of Washington, D.C. where he was also active in educational extracurricular activities, In high school he was elected student council president and won a scholarship to Baltimore’s John Hopkins University.

Upon graduation from College he became a seminarian and entered Villanova’s Augustinian Friars Seminary. After a year of teaching economics and world history he left the seminary to pursue a career in law.

That path drew him into politics where he eventually served as the Prince George’s Republican County chairman in Maryland. Along the way, in 1995 he was named Maryland State Republican Man of the Year and in 2000 he became the Maryland Republican State Chairman, the first African-American to serve as a Republican State Chairman.

In 2003 Steele was elected Maryland’s Lieutenant Governor and in 2006 he nearly became a United states senator from Maryland but in a bad year for Republicans, Steele lost in what he made a highly competitive and very close race.

It is Mike Steele’s varied background that has helped to shape him into the well rounded, sound thinking man that he is. He has a feel for what the people want and need and he understands what Republicans need to do.

In the immediate future Steele intends to start the Republican rebuilding process with efforts on three fronts. One will be the special election to fill the vacated seat of New York Congresswoman Kirsten Gillibrand who replaced Hilary Clinton in the United States senate. The other two efforts are the elections of Governors in New Jersey and Virginia.

Each of these efforts are quite important and not just policy wise. They are important psychologically. After having “hope” used against Republicans in the past election cycle, victories in these places will go a long way in boosting the spirits and hopes of Republicans nationally and I believe that Mike Steele can help us do it.

I believe the best modern day Republican Chairman that the party had was Lee Atwater back in the late 80’s and early in 1990.

Atwater was in touch, in tune innovative, crafty and open to new ideas and new approaches to voters. He also knew what message to run with and how to run with it.

Mike Steele has the potential to meet or exceed the good work of Lee Atwater.

He has indicated that he intends to insure, that one of the most important players in the process, the grassroots, play a crucial role and he has even endorsed a grass root created plan for the party:

That plan is as follows:

The Internet: Our #1 Priority in the Next Four Years

Winning the technology war with the Democrats must be the RNC’s number one priority in the next four years.

The challenge is daunting, but if we adopt a strongly anti-Washington message and charge hard against Obama and the Democrats, we will energize our grassroots base. Among other benefits, this will create real demand for new ways to organize and route around existing power structures that favor the Democrats. And, you will soon discover, online organizing is by far the most efficient way to transform our party structures to be able to compete against what is likely to be a $1 billion Obama reelection campaign in 2012.

Our near loss in the 2000 election sparked the 72 Hour program, after a brutal realization that we were being out-hustled in GOTV activities in the final days. Our partial success in the 2000 election didn’t blind us to the need for change, and our eyes must be wide open now. Barack Obama and the Democrats’ ability to build their entire fundraising, GOTV, and communications machine from the Internet is the #1 existential challenge to our existing party model.

Change is never easy, but as in the post-2000 period, it begins with tough love and a focus on what must be done at the local level.

What’s Wrong — And How to Fix It

  • Recruit 5 million new Republican online activists. Even a compelling message won’t go anywhere if we have no one to communicate it to. The next Chairman must undertake a crash program to grow the RNC’s email file organically — no spam and no “e-pending” from voter files. This will likely require a two-pronged strategy — 1) engaging grassroots Republicans directly in the fight against the Obama agenda, with creative grassroots actions that make Republicans want to stand together with members of their party, and 2) integrating e-mail signups into everything we do at the grassroots level, ensuring that everyone who goes to an event and or is contacted by a volunteer is given the opportunity to join our network.This goal seems daunting, but it forces us to think creatively about creating the sharpest, most compelling messages that will make people want to join us by the millions. If Newt Gingrich and T. Boone Pickens could each build an army of 1.4 million activists around energy, and Barack Obama could recruit 3 million to receive his VP selection by text message, then we know this is possible. If anything, given where the Internet will be in 2 or 4 years, we are low-balling the potential to create a new Republican online army.

 

  • Hold campaigns and local parties accountable. As important as it is that we invest in new technology at the national level, we must remember that the RNC’s primary objective is to win races state by state and district by district, not build up its own brand.To pursue this essential mission, individual campaigns must be held accountable for the number of emails they collect and the money they raise online. As much high-level attention must be paid to candidates’ online strategy as with the number of voter contacts made into a particular district or if the right media strategist is working the race. We must end a sense of dependence on the RNC at all levels — in which the RNC simply turns over its lists — and set goals that the campaigns must find creative and aggressive ways to meet:In target 2010 Congressional races, we recommend setting a standard of at least 5,000 in-district online activists recruited, and a minimum of $100,000 raised online.In target 2010 Senate races, we recommend a standard of 7,500 in-district online activists recruited and $150,000 raised online for each Congressional district.

 

  • A more open technology ecosystem. As tempting as it is to believe that there is a silver bullet to solve all our technology problems, this is very rarely the case. The technology gap will not be solved by funding multimillion dollar white elephants, but by unleashing free market competition among trusted entrepreneurs and volunteers who want to help the party. The RNC should open its technology ecosystem so that trusted partners can develop on top of GOP.com and Voter Vault. We must build a corps of outside technology volunteers who compete to write applications that actually improve party operations — and invest in the best ones. We must look beyond conventional political approaches to the Web, learning from technology hubs like Silicon Valley, and being unafraid to be the first in politics to adopt the changes in technology that are revolutionizing the consumer market.

Changing the Way We Run the Party

Everywhere we look, we see ordinary Americans using the connective power of the Internet to organize and take control of party politics. Look at what happened in our own primary with Ron Paul and Mike Huckabee coming out of nowhere largely with the help of the Internet, winning surprising political and fundraising victories. Before the Internet, Barack Obama would never have defeated Hillary Clinton to become the Democratic nominee and the next President.

The power of traditional connections is being replaced by the power of mass connectedness. Politics is taking place on a grander stage than ever before, with millions, and not just tens of thousands — participating directly in the process. Millions of people can not only vote, but they can organize with each other across geographic boundaries to build political power in real time. Their sheer scale allows them to rapidly outflank traditional power brokers in a way that simply wasn’t possible before.

The Republican Party can no longer survive in a modern era if we resist this new reality. With our power in Washington waning, our grassroots are the source of our greatest strength — not a problem to be managed. To revitalize ourselves, we must invite the crowd back in and tap their energy and creativity.

This isn’t just about the Internet — it’s about recognizing that in a people-powered era, with the power of technology-empowered grassroots movements on the rise — everything about the way we mobilize voters changes. Campaign plans that called for a few hundred or thousand volunteers making phone calls in the final days are hopelessly quaint and limiting in an era when millions of people want to feel connected and involved 24/7.

What’s Wrong — And How to Fix It

  • Rebuilding Our Grassroots Infrastructure. The fabric of the Republican Party at the local level is rending. We saw it this spring when a small and energized base of Ron Paul supporters succeeded in taking over many local party organizations.The reality is that this happened because our existing local party institutions are not all they could be. The Republican Party must be a civic institution again, with a volunteer base that is active year-round and is given real responsibility beyond showing up at a phone bank. In this last election, it should have been possible for volunteer leaders to organize their precinct or neighborhood for McCain, tasking them with knocking on doors, distributing signs, and most crucially, recruiting other volunteers to build the party exponentially. Instead, virtually all volunteer activity was channeled towards driving casual phone contacts, not personal neighbor-to-neighbor door knocks.Our technology should give Republican activists the ability to connect with fellow activists at the precinct level. We must encourage the growth of standalone volunteer communities, giving them the tools to organize themselves online, with the official party taking a step back and not trying to control them. We can’t anyway.Initially, the most important mode of contact will be volunteer-to-volunteer. It is only once we have built this army — one small group at a time — that we’ll be ready to go out in the field and talk to our voters. In the last campaign, the Republican Party banked on its strong get-out-the-vote (GOTV) operation, but even the strongest turnout operation could not have overcome the Democrats’ stronger recruitment, registration and persuasion efforts in the early phases of the cycle.

 

  • Time for a new fundraising model. The ability to raise startup capital precedes virtually everything else on a campaign. But those of us who worked the 2008 campaigns saw how everything — including political travel and grassroots outreach — was subsumed to maintain an aggressive high-dollar events schedule.Contrast this with the new President-elect. In addition to doing high-dollar events early on, he held rallies in major cities and required an e-mail address to attend. The 20,000 e-mail addresses collected at each of these events probably produced hundreds of thousands of dollars in contributions down the line, not to mention countless hours of volunteer time. By the end of the campaign, Obama didn’t have to do events, because he could raise virtually unlimited sums from a network of millions that his campaign continued to grow at every opportunity. The campaigns of the future will be infinitely scalable, blurring the lines between fundraising, volunteer recruitment, and message, and require more resources than traditional sources can possibly raise.This means kick starting a generational transition to the new fundraising model. Right now, we cannot compete with the Democrats’ scalable online fundraising machine and if this is not corrected our party will face a long-term financial deficit. A big part of this will be growing a millions-strong network of supporters and giving them something to rally around. Moreover, our candidate recruitment should focus less on a candidate’s ability to collect $2,300 checks or to self-fund than on the strength of their message — which will ultimately attract more small and high dollar donors online and off. Traditional fundraising is still important, but in modern campaigns, it’s more like startup venture capital money than a long-term cash cow. We must change the culture of how we fundraise. The end goal of this effort must be clear: put our 2012 Presidential nominee in a position to raise over 50% of their money from the Internet.

 

  • A 25,000-strong Nationwide Campaign Force. It isn’t just our candidate recruitment that’s wanting. We must replenish our pool of trained campaign workers who know how to win races from school board to the Senate, and who know how to integrate new media into their field and communications efforts.To do this, we propose that the next RNC Chair make it a priority to train 25,000 high-level activists by 2012. A few thousand of these will go on to run races. The rest will form the nexus of a permanent volunteer corps that keeps the Republican Party strong and relevant in local communities. And this training must occur in all 50 states and over the Internet, and not just in Washington, D.C.

 

  • Reorganizing the RNC. In order to accomplish these goals, the RNC’s organizational structure will need to change. It is not enough to have a dedicated eCampaign division if other departments fail to use the Internet to transform how they do business in this new environment. The Internet should pervade everything the RNC does, and leadership on this front must come directly from the Chairman’s Office.

Recruiting a New Generation of Candidates

Thus far, we’ve talked about building a better rocket to launch our party into orbit. But we are mindful of the fact that our candidates are the rocket fuel that gets us there. Without inspiring candidates with clear messages to rally around, all the strategies and tactics in the world will be for naught.

What’s Wrong — And How to Fix It

  • The 435 district strategy. By 2012, the Republican Party will field candidates in all 435 Congressional districts in America, from inner city Philadelphia to suburban Dallas, and our leaders must be held accountable for progress towards this goal. With an 80 plus vote margin separating Democrats from Republicans in the House, it’s time to widen the playing field, not narrow it. While our targeting has gotten narrower, honing in on a class of seats we feel entitled to because they lean Republican, Democrats have been stealing traditionally 60-40 Republican seats right and left. It’s time to return the favor.What’s more, it won’t be good enough to run perfunctory races in safe seats. 2008 showed us that every seat — Republican or Democrat — is potentially a target. If you aren’t seriously challenged this time, chances are you’ll be challenged the next time, or the time after that. Incumbents who don’t prepare for this reality will find themselves scrambling to catch up when the inevitable happens. That means that our party needs to set a new standard that campaigns will be professional and fully staffed in each and every seat.

 

  • But don’t stop at Congress. Building our bench and waging aggressive challenges doesn’t stop at Congress. State party chairs must also be held accountable for progress towards filing in 100% of state legislative races, with funding tied to progress towards this goal. The state houses are our bench, providing future leadership not just in Congress but in governorships and other statewide offices. They will also drive the 2010-12 redistricting cycle. The RNC must play a constructive role in recruiting and training candidates from the state house on up — and not just at the federal level. Just as Major League Baseball could not function without a vibrant minor league ecosystem, we must get back to basics and grow and nurture our party where it works best — closest to the people.

 

  • A “40 Under 40” initiative. Undoing the damage to our party’s brand among America’s youth will take more than new slogans and hip spokespeople. It will mean making young voters the face of the Republican Party, and not just another target group with its own bulleted list of “outreach” talking points. To that end, the next Chairman should commit to a simple goal: working towards a Republican Party where at least 40% of our challenger and open seat candidates for Congress are under 40. Such a party will send a signal to all Americans that the GOP is once again the party of the future.
       

Afterword: The Politics of Us

Obama’s victory could be a blessing in disguise for conservatives. Why? Because Obama’s winning strategy was built on the back of an inherently conservative idea: that we the people, acting together outside of government, can accomplish great things. Or, in the words of the overused slogan, “Yes We Can.”

The irony here is that Obama as President would act in ways that contradict the bottom-up culture that fueled his campaign. In the campaign, it was “Yes We Can.” In the White House, it will be “Yes, Government Can.” Obama’s top-down government control of the health care and the economy will give conservatives an opening to once again recapture the mantle of distributed citizen activism.

Obama campaigned against the establishment, and now he is the establishment.

Consider these contrasts. Like the Internet, free markets are distributed and allow good ideas to rise from the bottom up. The bureaucracies that Obama prefers are inherently top-down and stifling.

And yet Democrats have been allowed to get away with the notion that their success online is fueled by a “bottom-up” culture while Republicans are “top-down.” Ironic — given that Democrats want top-down government control of your life, while Republicans believe in dynamic markets and a strong civil society.

Some people believe our problems are mostly strategic and tactical. Others believe they are policy driven. It strikes us that there is a unifying solution to both, and that is to empower the individual, trust the people.

Just as Republicans must trust individuals and families with their own money, we must trust the volunteers who walk into our headquarters and train them to take responsibility for entire neighborhoods. We must trust the online grassroots who want to take action on our behalf, and who need a decentralized, peer-to-peer volunteer community supported by our campaigns to really be successful. That will require giving up some control — more control than our traditional institutions are used to giving up — in exchange for an exponentially larger and more effective volunteer/donor/activist ecosystem.

Obama tapped the Internet successfully because he made it about “you” and “us” not “me” and “I.” You were invited in. You were a key part of his campaign/movement. Your help was truly appreciated. Republican candidates need to grow more comfortable talking in these terms and focus less on being inaccessible objects of hero worship (the “me/I” strategy).

Because of the Internet, “us” becomes a force more powerful than any in politics. The ability to donate or volunteer instantaneously online gives the millions of “us” more leverage than even the most connected group of insiders. Only “us” will be powerful enough to fund the first $1 billion Presidential candidate. By embracing the Politics of Us, the Republican Party can rediscover its roots as the party of individual liberty and build a truly modern political army.

Aside from endorsing this plan, Mike Steele has his own plans to add to it and through it all Steele will provide a voice of leadership that will be appreciated.

As a commentator on political stories, Steele has been quite convincing when it comes to our true Republican positions on the issues. Over the past two years news outlets have turned to mike for his opinions and always willing, ready and able, Mike presented the republican case quite well.

That is something we need.

We need someone who can properly convey our message and Mike Steele can do that.

So we wish him luck and look forward to working with him as we rebuild and reinvigorate the grand old party in the months to come.

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punchline-politics

 

Late one night a mugger wearing a ski mask jumped into a path of a well-dressed man and stuck a gun in his ribs

give me your money,” he demanded.

Indignant, the affluent man replied,

you can’t do this – I am a United States congressman!”

In that case,” replied the mugger, “give me MY money.”

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POLITICS 24/7 ENDORSES KEN BLACKWELL FOR REPUBLICAN NATIONAL COMMITTEE CHAIR

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Bookmark and Share      On Friday Republican national committee members will be electing a new chairman of the Republican National Committee. There are six people running for the job and for that they should all be commended. There are not many people who would be willing to take on the responsibility of bringing our badly beaten party back to life but some people care enough to risk their reputations and sacrifice their time for the causes that they believe in.

Such is the case with Ken Blackewell, Saul Anuzis, Mike Steele, Katon Dawson, Chip Saltsman and incumbent chairman Mike Duncan.

All of these men bring some good ideas to the table, some more than others.

Mike Duncan, the incumbent probably has the toughest case to present for reelecting him. Since he took over after Republicans lost congress in 2006, we only lost more. That cannot all be blamed on him. Republican elected officials did not perform the way the should, so blame lies where blame stems from but Duncan still has not presented a case that portrays him as a superior choice.

Chip Saltsman, the former Tennessee G.O.P. Chair and former Mike Huckabee campaign manager should not be running.

After Saltsman sent out copies of the “Barack The Magic Negro” CD as Christmas gifts to voting members of the national committee, whether he realized it or not, he disqualified himself. I for one do not want someone who is obviously so insensitive and unaware of the ramifications of his actions to chair the R.N.C.

As for the rest, well they are all good.

I like Mike Steele and wish he won his Senate seat in Maryland. He has the type of thinking that we need in Congress.

However, I do not know if he has what it takes to rebuild the party. In that area I favored Michigan’s Republican state Chairman, Saul Anuzis.

Anuzis is down to earth and into the grassroots. As the chair of Michigan’s Republican party he has been keeping things competitive and he is on top of the technology that we need to implement nationally.

KEN BLACKWELL

KEN BLACKWELL

However Ohio’s former Secretary of State, Ken Blackwell is who I have decided to support.

He not only believes that the grassroots should shape policy direction, he believes that the grassroots should lead the way and he wants to make the state and local parties true shareholders in our national effort. Sort of a bottom up strategy.

I believe in that strategy.

I believe that instead of Republican officials coming before the people and trying to tell us what is best for us, we should have the ability to tell them what is best for us and then they should run that way and with our message, lead in that direction.

Calling his plan to rebuild the party a “Conservative Resurgence Plan” Blackwell states “We will bring our party back by clearly articulating conservative principles, inspiring our base, decentralizing authority, and building technical and precinct–level organizational capacity to facilitate a conservative resurgence across the country for the GOP.”

I wont say that says it all but it does sum up what we need to do pretty well.

In addition to endorsing a plan for our future that was created by grass root Republicans at REBUILDthePARTY.com, Blackwell enhancing that plan with his own by increased and innovative uses of the internet as well as other person to person forums. Primarily, his plan consists of the following 10 points.

  • We must have an RNC Chairman who has credibility with the public and the media in order to articulate our principles, values, and ideas in the absence of a Republican President, Speaker, and Majority Leader.
  • We must have a leader who understands that the Republican Party’s conservative principles and values are both fundamentally correct and in line with the belief systems of the American electorate.
  • We must be able to translate our principles and values into ideas with 21st Century solutions that make sense to a family sitting around the dinner table.
  • We must inspire a new generation of conservatives into our party by drawing contrasts with Democrats regarding these principles, values, and ideas.
  • We must invest heavily in strong state and local party organizations so that our party has the capacity to organize the electorate and recruit new volunteers and donors. This includes providing seed money to party organizations that lack startup resources and providing speakers to all state party organizations.
  • We must have the technological infrastructure in place to harness the grassroots energy that will be created when the public turns against the liberal democrats in Washington.
  • We must have regional strategies and specific plans for each region and state. We must invest resources in redeveloping our party organizations in the Northeast, never take the South for granted, win over the Reagan Democrats in the Midwest, and compete for Hispanic and Asian-American votes in the West.
  • We must make a serious effort to be competitive with African Americans and other minorities across the country. 
  • We must take a stand against corruption, Republican or Democrat. We can no longer be critical of Democrats while turning a blind eye to scandals and corruption amongst our own.
  • The 2010 midterm elections and the resulting battles over redistricting will shape the future of both political parties. We must “win” the redistricting

Each and every point is not only valid but essential to success. But knowing that these are things we must do is not enough. Knowing how to implement them through an election is important and as a highly successful, former secretary of State, Ken Blackwell knows just how to do that.

 His experience as a Secretary State and chief arbitrator in state elections is invaluable to our future.

So when all is said and done, my support goes to Ken Blackwell.

I believe he is the man best suited for the job of bringing Republicans back with a vengeance and a “Conservative Resurgence”.

For the details of Blackwells plan go to:

http://kenblackwell.com/wp-content/uploads/2008/12/blackwell_rnc_resurgence.pdf

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