Tag Archives: Assemblyman Jay Webber

New Jersey Celebrates Ronald Reagan’s 100th Birthday with Michael Ragan

Bookmark and Share On Friday, New Jersey Assemblyman Jay Webber held his 8th annual New Jersey Reagan Day Dinner. What started out 8 years ago as a fine and fun cozy event that was first held in a local firehouse, was now held in the grand ballroom of the Sheraton where over 650 people gathered to commemorate Ronald Reagan and celebrate his life and achievements on the 100th anniversary of his birth.

Among the many in attendance included a large number of state senators and assemblymen including Assemblymen Michael Carroll, Anthony Bucco, Alex DeCroce, State Senator Joe Pennachio and a many others from the state legislature. Also attending was former New Jersey Governor Tom Kean. I had the fortune to sit with congressional candidate Anna Little, who has not stopped campaigning as she prepares to force Frank Pallone in to an long overdue retirement in 2012.

Assemblyman Jay Webber

All across America, literally thousands of such events were taking place on this weekend, but thanks to Assemblyman Webber and the Young Americans Foundation, New Jersey’s celebration featured a keynote address by President Reagan’s son. As he noted in his opening remarks, “not the son who dances,”. The speech delivered on this night was by the Reagan son who represents conservative principles and maintains his father’s legacy……..Michael Reagan.

Reagan offered those in attendance, a peek into the personal side of Reagan, but it each personal tale quickly tied in to the political side of our 40th and demonstrated that President Reagan leadership was less politics and more principle. Ronald Reagan was not interested in playing politics. He was not a man who followed polls to determine his policies, he was a man who followed his beliefs in what he thought was best for the American people. And as demonstrated in the stories told by Michael Reagan, those believes were founded in Reagan’s commitment to the conservative values and principles that he helped to make the mainstream beliefs of the Republican Party.

One of the stories Mike Reagan told was about when as a young man in the early 1960’s, he asked his father for a raise in his allowance. Michael Reagan than explained how his father who was the type of person whom if you asked what time it was, would tell you how the watch that told you the time, was made, quickly broke in to a long dissertation about how much it cost for food, maintaining their ranch and how much in taxes the government took away from every dollar earned. Michael Reagan explained that by the time he was done, he offered his father back half of the allowance that he had given him. Then his father turned to him and said, “I don’t want half your allowance back, but I’ll make you a promise. When we elect a President who cuts taxes, I’ll raise your allowance”.

According to Michael Reagan, in 1964, after LBJ pushed through the Kennedy tax cuts, his father told him a promise is a promise and raised his allowance to five dollars. The only problem was in 1964, Michael was in high school and he told the audience, while his father may have thought that was a lot of money, as kid in high school, he sure didn’t. But he always remembered how his father kept his promises.

Reagan cited another example of promises kept when he revealed that the selection of Sandra Day O’Connor to the Supreme Court was the result of a promise made to his daughter Maureen.

During the 1980 campaign, Ronald Reagan’s advisors were concerned with how Maureen’s outspoken support for the ERA would impact on Reagan during the primaries. So they along with her father, approached Maureen about it. Her response was, “I’ll pull back on the Equal Rights Amendment but only if you agree that if elected President, you appoint the first woman to the United States Supreme Court”. Ronald Reagan agreed. And when an opening became available, he appointed Sandra day O’Connor, the first woman on the highest court in the land.

It was this belief in promises being sacred that influenced the direction of the Reagan presidency. As Michael Reagan explained, his father once told him that one of the reasons he wanted to become President was because he was tired of the United States always sitting down with the Soviet Union and given something up in order form to them reach any agreement. As a result Ronald Reagan made a personal promise to change that by insuring that he would bring about a day when  the Soviet Union would give up something instead. Ronald Reagan kept that promise.

There were many more insightful tales and a number of lighthearted but hysterical stories involving the Secret Service. All together, Michael Reagan delivered an address that reinforced the audiences admiration and appreciation for President Reagan and everyone agreed that they felt a strong bond to Ronald Reagan the person, not just the politician.

When it was over, Michael Reagan took questions. One member of the audience asked if he was leaning in a particular direction when it came towards a Republican nominee for President in 2012. Reagan offered no sign of favoritism towards any candidate. However he did have advice for Republicans in 2012.

Mike Reagan told the capacity crowd that he firmly believes no matter who the G.O.P. nominates, they should adhere to the 80/20 rule his father believed in. Ronald Reagan once famously stated “The person who agrees with you 80 percent of the time is a friend and an ally – not a 20 percent traitor.” It is that thinking which Michael Reagan told the audience to remember in November of 2012.

He added;

“Let me put it to you this way, who will you support….Sarah Palin or Barack Obama? Paul Ryan or Barack Obama? Rick Perry or Barack Obama?.

As for the opinions of some of the New Jersey elected officials in the room, I took an unofficial and off the record poll of where they stand right now regarding 2012. While I will not reveal who said what, I can tell you that like Michael Reagan, none endorsed any particular presidential contenders, but as for who they like as we go into the nominating process, names like Huckabee, Daniels, Romney, Giuliani and several others came up. So from the looks of it, there is not any early coordinated effort by the influential elected officials of the state to consolidate support for anyone in particular. That in my view is a good thing. It would be good for New Jersey to have as many as candidates as possible, come to the Garden State and spend their money here while also campaigning among us and earning our support based upon their ideas and abilities.

Now if only we can get our elected officials to change our primary system to a proportionate one rather than a winner-take-all contest. With New Jersey being stuck in between the New York and Philadelphia markets, campaigning here is more expensive than in most states. As such, if candidates for the nomination have no chance at picking up at least a few delegates, they are less inclined to invest any time or money here. That causes New Jersey to lose out. But that is for another day. As for this particular Friday and the New Jersey Reagan Day Dinner held on it, everyone was a winner. However the biggest winner of all was Jay Webber and his exceptional and professional staff and volunteers who pulled off a well planned, well executed, smooth running, memorably enjoyable evening that gave all of us the opportunity to celebrate one of nation’s greatest contemporary American heroes……President Ronald Reagan.

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Michael Reagan Gives Keynote Address at Jay Webber’s Reagan Day Dinner

Bookmark and Share    On February 6th, America will celebrate the centennial anniversary of one our nation’s most popular contemporary Presidents……..Ronald Reagan.

Ronald Wilson ReaganEvents to commemorate the day will be held throughout the nation. But here in New Jersey, one man has championed the cause of our state’s annual contribution to insure the continuation of the Reagan legacy with our celebration.

On Friday, February 4th, Assemblyman Jay Webber is conducting his 8th annual tribute to America greatest modern champion of freedom at a dinner that will be featuring Michael Reagan as its keynote speaker.

Michael is the eldest son President and is a conservative political commentator and the author of several books, including On the Outside Looking In: Twice Adopted and The Common Sense of an Uncommon Man; The Wit, Wisdom, and Eternal Optimism of Ronald Reagan.

Assemblyman Jay Webber

With all the events that are being conducted to commemorate the Reagan centennial during this first weekend in February, to have Michael Reagan join us in New Jersey is a testimonial to Jay Webber, the importance of his annual celebration and the great appreciation that many in New Jersey have for Ronald Reagan. Assemblyman Webber had to pull many strings to pull this one off and the fact that he could get Michael Reagan to attend New Jersey’s Reagan Day Dinner, out of all those occurring on this same night, is an indication of just how influential and respected the Assemblyman has become in conservative politics.

Assemblyman Webber is truly a rising star in New Jersey. He is among the hardest working, most principled, fair minded and conservative legislators the state has ever seen. And like Ronald Reagan, Jay Webber is not an angry conservative, he is an optimistic one, with common sense, and innovative ideas. Webber is also a leader who can articulate the conservative cause in a way that resonates with people of any political stripe. All of which probably accounts for the deep sense of appreciation for Ronald Reagan that led him to become the founder of the annual New Jersey Reagan Day.

According to Assemblyman Webber:

“We owe it to Ronald—to his ideas and historic accomplishments—to celebrate his 100th birthday with freedom-loving Americans and to work together to turn the tide in America toward freedom”.

This year’s New Jersey Reagan’s Day dinner is sure be the best yet—-one that will be fitting for the extra special occasion of a centennial celebration.

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Event details:

  • Friday, February 4th,2011
  • At the Sheraton Hilton
  • 199 Smith Road, Parsippany
  • 6:00 p.m. Doors Open
  • 6:30 p.m. Program and Dinner
  • Tickets: $45.00
  • RSVP’s Required

To request reservations click the invitation below

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TEA Party Must Have A Say In the Redistricting Process

Bookmark and Share  After a year when millions of Americans began taking their civic responsibilities more serious than ever and joined together in the TEA Party movement in an attempt to change government for the better, it would be a shame to see that activity end after just one election cycle. It would be an even greater shame to see all that they have achieved in such a relatively small amount of time, reversed by politics as usual. Having gotten involved in the elections and having changed the results of those elections, the TEA Party has a responsibility to see their efforts through. Not only must they stay involved and keep those officials they carried to victory true to their words, they must now take the time to deepen their political involvement and effect those areas of politics which often get little attention but carry more weight than the results of just any one election cycle.

In 2011 one such area which requires their attention is the redistricting process.

This once every decade event, shapes the political landscape of every state in our nation as well as national government. It determines the districts which we elect our leaders from. Everything from City council lines to legislative districts and congressional districts are drawn. Left to their own devices, in the hands of politicians the process becomes one known as gerrymandering. It is an underhanded practice that divides communities not along geographic lines but along political lines. Left in the hands of politicians and political parties, redistricting is based on how they can draw districts that contain a majority of votes for their Party’s candidates.

This gerrymandering process undermines the electoral process. It helps determine election results before campaigns have even started by insuring that a minority of one Party and the majority of the other constitute the makeup of enough districts to elect a majority in state legislatures and the House of Representatives, thereby insuring one Party or the other, control of those legislative bodies and the legislative process.

Gerrymandering is the reason why so few seats in Congress are competitive. It is why the defeat of less than 14% of incumbent House members in 2010 was considered a political landslide. It is why out of 435 seats in the House of Representatives, only an approximate number of 100 of them were really contested. The other 335 were forgone conclusions.

This is unacceptable for those who have a vested interest in fair elections and the democratic process. This should be unacceptable to those who consider themselves a part of the TEA Party and are fed up with political games as usual and political sleights of hand. It should be intolerable to those who wish to see their elected officials elected based upon their qualifications, their beliefs and their effectiveness, not just simply their Party registration.

That is why it is important that the TEA Party not rest on their laurels for too long. They have tasted victory in 2010 but that now means that in 2011 they have a responsibility to fulfill. They can’t just effect the outcome of one election and retreat back to their less civic oriented days of casual or occasional political involvement or concern. They must continue to learn about the behind the scenes political process that cheats us all out a fair process. They must work as hard as they did to effect the elections of 2010, to now effect the process that effects those elections.

During the next few months, state legislatures across America will be begin to slice and dice the political maps. In the vast majority of states, the process is run and determined by each state’s upper and lower houses of the legislature and the Governor. For some states that means one Part is in total control of the process. In other states it means that Republicans and Democrats are both involved in hammering the new district lines together. But even in those cases, political deals are cut in order to save one legislator other.

That is why the very next mission of the TEA Party must be to interject itself in to the redistricting process. They must educate themselves about the process, establish their own suggested guidelines in drawing the new district lines and demand that those guidelines are heard and applied, fairly and properly.

In New Jersey, thanks in large part to Assemblyman Jay Webber, the Chairman of the Republican Delegation to the New Jersey redistricting Commission, at least four public hearing swill be held in order to get the publics input on the redistricting process. It is an opportunity which we she seek more of and must take advantage of.

Those hearing are currently scheduled as follows;

  • Wednesday, January 12 6 pm Rutgers Law School, Newark
  • Thursday, January 13 6 pm Hudson County Community College, Jersey City
  • Tuesday, January 18 6 pm Rowan University, Glassboro
  • Thursday, January 20 6 pm Ocean County Administration Building, Toms River
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New Jersey Republican State Chairman Jay Webber Abruptly Resigns

Bookmark and Share   Assemblyman Jay Webber, the Chairman of the New Jersey Republican State Committee, has resigned from his position as Chairman. The announcement was an unexpected one which seems to have partially been the result of a number of small disagreements between Webber and Governor Christie. In addition to the Governor being unsettled by a letter concerning the budget of the upcoming State Reapportionment Commission,  the Assemblyman is said to have also  been frustrated with  a level of secrecy surrounding the operations of Reform Jersey Now, a fundraising entity created by Governor Christie’s closest confidants and was uncomfortable with the lack of assistance provided by the Governor on state G.O.P. fundraising efforts during the summer, when the Governor was traveling across the country to campaign for fellow Republican gubernatorial candidates. 
As for the disagreement over the letter that Webber sent out regarding the Reapportionment Commission budget, earlier  today, Assemblyman Webber released the same letter on his Facebook page, leading some to wonder if  he was reinforcing his position despite the Governors sentiments.

In a statement to the press, Webber called his resignation “bittersweet” and stated that the only reason for his early departure was due to his commitment to the once in a decade redistricting process, a process that redraws the new congressional and state legislative districts through a reapportionment commission of which Webber is the Republican delegation’s Chairman to and his commitment to responsibilities in the Assembly as a member of the Labor and ever important Budget Committees.  The Assemblyman felt that now was the most appropriate time for him to step aside as State G.O.P. Chairman, focus on his other important responsibilitiesm and allow for the next NJGOP Chairman to get a head start in giving the critical pre-2011 election operations the attention that they deserve and require in the months ahead.

Jay Webber is probably one of New Jersey’s greatest political assets. He is an outstanding voice for conservatism, an unusually outstanding one for a state like New Jersey. He is additionally a dedicated and responsible representative of his legislative district. He is one of those rare political leaders who emanates a genuine sincerity of purpose and ability to boot. As such, he has been entrusted with the stewardship of many important tasks and therefore does indeed have much on his plate. So Webber’s claim to focus on such things as the ever important state budget and the critical redistricting that will effect elections for the next decade, is quite palatable. But seeing him resign his post as State Party Chairman is a loss and the Governor’s willingness to let Webber leave the post is a disappointing one.

During his less than two years in the position of Chairman, the NJGOP experienced its first statewide victory in 12 years, regained the 3rd Congressional District seat, won over 52% of the Congressional votes statewide in 2010; gained a State Assembly seat and a net gain of 22 countywide seats, regained control of the Bergen and Monmouth County Freeholder Boards; implemented an historic Victory program in 2009 that made over 2.3 million volunteer phone calls, knocked on over 170,000 doors, and recruited more than 3500 volunteers, raised over $4 million for candidates and party operations; and registered more than 42,000 new Republican voters.

While Chris Christie and the nationwide political trends against Democrats, Webber was surely not solely responsible for all of these successes but he most certainly was instrumental in maximizing our gains and organizing the means to take advantage of positive Republican prospects.

Webber’s replacement is expected to be Saddle River Mayor and Christie confidant, Sam Raia.

For his part Raia issued a statement crediting now former Chairman Webber with great success and vowing to build upon that success and to take back the legislature in this year’s elections.

To do so, Raia will have a lot of work to do. For now, considering the big shoes that he has to fill, he will need the support of Republicans throughout the state and the full cooperation of Governor Christie.

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Lightheaded and Dizzy, Senator Lautenberg Falls And Gets Hospitalized

Bookmark and Share    At 86 years old, Monday night, New Jersey Senator Frank Lautenberg fell at his Cliffside Park home after feeling dizzy and lightheaded. As a precautionary measure, was rushed to the hospital by ambulance and after undergoing an endoscopy it was disclosed that the octogenarian senator was suffering from a bleeding ulcer that he was promptly treated for.

An aide to the Senator announced that Lautenberg is expected to have a full recovery and after a night of routine observation, the Senator should be back to work very soon.

Nonetheless, even before Frank Lautenberg took his fall, most of us have known that Lautenberg is usually lightheaded and dizzy. It is called liberalism, but that aside, at 86 years old, one must ask how much dizzier and lightheaded can Frank get before he is unable to pretend to represent the people of New Jersey responsibly?

Now that New Jersey has a Republican governor, Lautenberg will be propped up by the state and national Democrat committees for as long as humanly possibly but at some point, rigamortis will set in and it will be hard to hide. When that time does come, Chris Christie will have to replace Frank and that replacement is not likely to be a Democrat.

Sorry Frank Pallone, but your stuck, again, being the bridesmaid, never the bride.

Who Christie’s appointment will be is anyone’s guess. But there are certainly a number of good choices for him to make…..conservative choices like Assemblyman and State Republican Chairman Jay Webber.  Or maybe my personal favorite for this job, Congressman Scott Garret, the most conservative member of the Garden State congressional delegation.

Two other possibilities, State Senators Joe Kyrillos and Jennifer Beck, are a little less conservative than Garrett or Webber but still solid choices. And what’s more is, they are close confidants of the Governor. So they may have an inside track. If that is the case, Kyrillosmay have the edge.

During the race for Governor, it was rumored that Joe Kyrillos was going to resign his state senate seat and retire if he was not picked to be Christie’s Lieutenant Governor running mate. Well neither happened and Kyrillos is showing no clear sign of leaving politics anytime soon.  So the very possible eventual vacancy that will open up in Lautenberg’s Senate seat may just be filled in with Joe Kyrillos.

Of course, Governor Christie’s friend, State Senator Jennifer Beck, would make an outstanding choice that can place a lot of political points on Christie’s plate.  As a woman, she would be the first female US Senator in the state and her appeal among the electorate would be widespread. She is bright, articulate, energetic and real go getter.

But Chris Christie is hard to judge. Sometimes, his prosecutorial backgrounds causes him to go out of the way in attempts to look above reproach. That sometimes makes those closest to him, the least likely to benefit form him. So Christie may not want to tap anyone he has any close personal or political ties to.

That is how he wound up choosing Monmouth County Sheriff Kim Guadagno as his Lieutenant Governor. While competent, forceful and outspoken, Guadagno had no real ties to Christie.

Either way, speculation of who Christie might choose to fill a vacancy in the US Senate can continue to run wild, but until Lauternberg either admits that the job is beyond him or until till death do him part, New Jersey is stuck with another dead headed liberal representing them in the U.S. Senate.

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Join New Jersey In Paying Tribute To President Ronald Reagan

Bookmark and Share  Ronald-Reagan-1985  Few annual political events in New Jersey are growing in popularity as much as Assemblyman Jay Webber’s New Jersey Reagan Day Dinner.   And this year the state’s “tribute to the life and legacy of our 40th President” is going to be the biggest yet.

This, the Seventh Annual New Jersey Reagan Day, will feature former Attorney General Ed Meese as its Keynote speaker.

Few men worked as closely with President Reagan as did Ed Meese. He was at his side for over 21 years and through his two terms as Governor of California and two terms as president of the United States.

When President Reagan first took office, Mr. Meese, served as Reagan’s chief policy adviser, a responsibility that, as Counselor to the President, was his from 1981 to 1985. In February of 1985, President Reagan made Ed Meese the 75th Attorney General of the United States. Prior his work in the White House, Attorney General Meese played a role in each of President Reagan’s two presidential bids and both elections for Governor of California.

While in Sacramento, Mr. Meese served then Governor in several different capacities including Chief of Staff, Executive Assistant and from 1967 through 1968, he was the Governor’s Legal Affairs Secretary.

Reagan and Meese appreciated and trusted and each other. And appreciated each others talents and abilities. That respect and appreciation was never more evident as the time President Reagan told reporters;

“If Ed Meese is not a good man, there are no good men”.

The feeling for Ed Meese was mutual. And it is that special bond and knowledge of one another that makes Ed Meese probably the most appropriate political leader to offer the Keynote address at New Jersey’s tribute to President Reagan

Reagan and Meese worked together through some tough times in our nation’s history and not only did they get us back on our feet again, they stood us on solid ground and provided a roadmap for prosperity and security. A roadmap that many American’s see us taking a detour from as the current Administration and the ruling liberal regime marches us down a path of mediocrity and dependence on government.

Last year’s Reagn Day dinner saw a crowd well in excess of two or more hundred as the room opened up in order to allow more tables to be set for the arrival of many more people than was expected. And in addition to a host of state, county and municipal leaders, it also attracted all the candidates who were vying for the Republican gubernatorial nomination. That included the inevitable nominee and now incumbent Governor, Chris Christie.

This year is different though. This year, a sense of a nation that has wandered off track and in need of a return to the conservative values and practical application of government that Reagan offered, will probably attract even more people and top name political leaders. Although the official NJ Reagan Dinner invitation does not say it, I suspect that after showing up last year as a candidate, Chris Christie will be showing up again, but this time as Governor.  If by chance he can not show up, there is a pretty good chance that our new, and the state’s first Lieutenant Governor, Kim Guadagno will be there to say a few words.   (These are my expectations, not those of the event’s organizers or sponsors, so don’t hold them accountable to my prediction.  Hold me accountable)

Last year, the man responsible for the New Jersey Reagan Day dinner was a prominent young Assemblyman. This year that man, Jay Webber, is still a prominent young Assemblyman but he is now also the Chairman of the State Republican Party. As such, unless of course there is some kind of emergency that creates a scheduling conflict, protocol would dictate that Governor Christie show his respects with a personal appearance. After all, Assemblyman Webber is now the leader of the Governor’s Party and he is also the man that gave candidate Christie the opportunity to address hundreds of Republicans when he wanted their support. Now it’s Governor Christie’s chance to show his appreciation and make a return appearance.

It should be noted that in addition to the main purpose of this event, our tribute to President Reagan, and in addition to the possible appearance of Governor Christie, another good reason to head out to the Reagan Day dinner is to thank your host, Assemblyman Webber.

Assemblyman Webber is truly one of the state’s brightest stars.

He is among the most conservative legislators that we have and he is no establishment politician who simply goes along to get along. He is a fighter and a true defender of the Reagan values that made our nation strong and can make our state strong. Legislators like him are, unfortunately far and few between, so it is up to all of us to have his back because he’s got ours.

So be sure to make it to the 7th Annual Reagan Day Dinner.

Join Assemblyman Webber, Attorney General Meese and all the others who will be paying tribute to our greatest contemporary President,…….Ronald Wilson Reagan.

The party is :

Friday, February 19th, 2010

From 6 to 8 pm

  at the

Zeris Inn

372 Route 46 East

Mountain Lakes, New Jersey

Tickets are $40.00 per person and that includes a Full Dinner Buffet with Dessert, but lushes beware, it is a cash bar.

Checks can be made out to New Jersey Reagan Day,  42 Carlson Place, Lake Hiawatha, NJ 07034-3102

For more information you can call (201) 602-4468 or visit www.njreaganday.com

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Jersey’s Largest Paper Pokes Dems & Reps Right In Their Eyes and Endorses Chris Daggett for Governor

Bookmark and Share    The Star-Ledger is one of New Jersey’s largest newspapers. It mainly serves Northern and Central New Jersey, where the largest portions of the state’s population exists. Like most newspapers, they are struggling for readers. With 24 Chris Dagget, Independent candidate for governor of New Jerseyhour news outfits on radio and television and the internet, they are hardly do or die sources of the most up to date news anymore. But the Star Ledger just did something that transformed it from being an outlet that delivers the news, to an outfit that is the news.

In a surprise move, The Star-Ledger has come out and endorsed Chris Daggett for Governor of New Jersey.

Under funded and underexposed, Chris Daggett has been running as an independent candidate. His campaign has been as well run as any effort of its size could be. He does not have party powerbrokers wheeling and dealing for him, he has no union bosses intimidating their members into canvassing communities for him and he has no major corporations, lobbyists or political party throwing oodles of dollars into his campaign. Given that and the fact that it is uniquely difficult to become known statewide in New Jersey, Chris Daggett has been doing remarkably well for himself. His polling numbers haven’t hit 20% yet but they are still higher than 10%. Not bad for a candidate who, in a matter of months, has come from relative obscurity to prominent player.

Daggett’s plight would not normally garner much attention and to be honest, he’s nothing special. He is not a particularly unique or great leader. But with less than four weeks till Election Day what just happened makes Daggett and his candidacy newsworthy and a powerful force to reckon with. The Star-Ledger’s endorsement of Chris Daggett creates a partnership of sorts  between a struggling newspaper and a struggling candidate and together, they have just poked their fingers into the eyes of the political establishment.

In plain English, the Star-Ledger came out and endorsed Daggett, not because he is uniquely qualified or even the most qualified person for the job. They did so because Democrat Governor Corzine and Republican candidate for Governor, Chris Christie have proven themselves to not be up to the job and because, as they put it, both Democrats and Republicans:

 have forfeited any claim to the trust and confidence of the people of New Jersey. They share responsibility for the state’s current plight.”

As a Republican, I have to agree with that assessment too.

As a Republican there are few  incumbent G.O.P. legislators in New Jersey who adhere to the conservative principles that make me a Republican and  translate them into the practical application of our government and its policies. I won’t corner myself by claiming that there aren’t any good New JerseyRrepublicans.  There are a few stands out who are exceptions to that opinion.  A  handful of worthy, conservative Republicansdo exist.   In the state Assembly there’s  Jay Webber, Michael Carroll, and Michael Doherty . In the State Senate, while not exactly being the most conservative, Bill Baroni and Jennifer Beck are still quite promising figures. In Congress, Rep. Scott Garrett is a true and outstanding voice for traditional Republican policy and values. So there are exceptions but since none of them are running for Governor, and since the majority of New Jersey Republicans fall far short from those I mentioned, my opinion of the Jersey G.O.P. remains negative.

Chris Christie and the events leading up to his candidacy only enhanced that view. Before Christie even announced that he would run for Governor, rank and file Republicans came out and endorsed him in unprecedented numbers . Establishment New Jersey Republicans always manage to get behind a lousy losers either because they have name ID or money. To hell with what they believe in or how good the candidates in question are.   Republican leaders in New Jersey give away the nomination to anyone with good  name recognition or lots of money.   In 2008 they got behind Rudy Giuliani like teenagers waiting in line to buy the hottest new single by Madonna.   This year they did it again , but with Chris Christie for Governor instead of Rudy giuliani for President.  Christie never earned the nomination by proving himself or presenting solid plans for the state’s future.  The status quo, establishment  just said, “Here.  The nomination is yours”.  

 And so what did they get?

They got a man who had a reputation as great crime busting federal prosecutor but failed to demonstrate how that reputation will translate into being a good governor.  Aside from saying that he will do things differently than Jon Corzine, Christie has wasted valuable time not telling us what he would do differently nor has he given a detailed answer to any question or presented a solid plan for New Jersey. This has not helped to instill any confidence in him among the voters.

With little to say, his campaign has not had much to go on and it shows because his campaign has been a poorly run effort that has dropped the ball on many issues. It is also why his once double digit lead over Jon Corzine has evaporated.

As for Jon Corzine, his record speaks for itself. As Governor he has presided over nothing less than a mess. As a leader, he has failed to control any circumstances or conditions. He has consistently been a victim of circumstance who has constantly been shaped by events and unable to shape events. On this, the Star-Ledger writes;

 “Corzine is the chaplain on a pirate ship, not really its captain.”

Here again, I agree with the Star-Ledger.

None of this is new for New Jersey Republicans and Democrats. Recent history shows that Jersey Republicans have only come into the power of majority status whenever Democrats fail and screw everything up. They never win based on any credit of their own. As for New Jersey Democrats, they too only regain majority status after Republicans screw up. The Star-Ledger puts it this way:

“For too long, the cliche about New Jersey’s two great parties has seemed all too true — that Democrats are corrupt, Republicans incompetent. Nothing will cause them to change their ways for the better except repudiation at the polls Nov. 3.”

They may just be right about that too. However I do not believe that Republicans are inherently incompetent. When true conservative principles are translated into the practical application of government, those policies work. From fighting crime to combating unemployment and taxes, innovative conservative thinking based on less government and more freedom do work. The problem is that New Jersey Republicans never see their ideological train of thought completely through . If they did, perhaps the success of such right of center policies could be seen. But we will not find that out anytime soon because Christie is not a conservative. He’s a Democrat-lite candidate and not even a very good one at that.

I have tried to give Chris Christie a chance each and every day, and each and every day he disappoints me. With a little more than 3 weeks to go, I still will give him a chance. Perhaps he will release a well thought out plan that shows he means business. One that allows us to take him serious and offers hope for turning things around in the state.

I really do not want Jon Corzine to be reelected. His shallow, Obama-based campaign and grossly incompetent management of the state make him the last person to vote for.  However, unless Christie proves to me that he can and will govern based on the principles that make me a Republican, than I do not want a Democrat-lite like him to win either. That will only encourage the establishment Republicans and to continue watering down our principles.

That explains why, although I do not want to, I may very well for Chris Daggett.

Jersey Republicans need to wake up. Perhaps losing a race that they once had in the palm of their hands, will do that. I do not want to encourage bad behavior or reward it. That is why I am preparing to vote for Chris Daggett. And the sad thing is, I believe an awful lot of Republicans will feel that way too. Many Democrats have similar sentiments towards Corzine. They see he has been a failure and many democrat voters who feel that same way, will also be voting for Daggett. Will it be enough to pull Chris Daggett over the top? At this juncture in the race, I don’t think so. I do however believe that Daggett may syphon off enough votes from Chritie  to deny him the margin of victory.

Add to that the combination of Corzine’s personal wealth, unlimited spending and union support, his Get Out The Vote (GOTV) effort will be far superior to Chris Christie’s and ultimately I believe a strong showing from Daggett and a weaker than expected turnout for Christie will give New Jersey what it deserves. Another four years of Jon Corzine.

Of course, we could all just join together like Dagget and The Star-Ledger did. Us struggling citizens of New Jersey could take the lead of a struggling newspaper and support the struggling candidacy of Chris Daggett. That would in fact send the right message.   The Star-Ledger articulated that point  quite well in their endorsement of Daggett when they wrote;

“As for government experience, Daggett, who has a doctorate in education, has at least as much as his rivals, having worked for both Democratic and Republican governors and served as regional administrator of the federal Environmental Protection Agency. His mastery of detail is impressive.

The reservation one hears about Daggett among the surprising number who say they’d like to vote for him is that he can’t win. And, indeed, the ballot position assigned Daggett and other independents makes his task daunting. You’ll have to hunt to find him.

But the value of a vote is not limited to picking a winner. The real value lies in the signal it sends about what the voter believes is best for the city, county or state — not merely at the moment, but long-term.

We believe Daggett is best.

For disappointed Democrats and Republicans, a decision to vote for Daggett will mean a break with party loyalty — no easy thing. What we’re suggesting is a temporary suspension of that loyalty as a way to begin changing the corrosive culture of Trenton. Daggett would owe nothing to either party establishment; he’d be free to recruit best talent wherever he found it. As he told The Star-Ledger editorial board, he’d feel no obligation to honor the traditional Democratic-Republican deal that requires bipartisan balance on the Supreme Court. He’d apparently take the best he could find regardless of party affiliation — or lack thereof.”

It is not often that I agree with the lamestream media but unless Chris Christie gives me reason to believe otherwise in the closing days of this election, not only will I agree with them, I will be taking their advice.

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28 Years Ago The Economy Recovered By Giving Freedom A Chance

Bookmark and Share   Last week marked the 28th anniversary of Ronald Reagan’s signing of the 1981 Economic Recovery Tax Act. When it comes to the economic recovery methods that we have adopted b.govtoday,  it is appallingly easy to see that we our government has lost its way since then.
 
The approach to government that Reagan instilled in the conduct of contemporary conservative governance was basic. It was rooted in the belief that the engine which propelled America’s greatness was not government but the nation’s people.
 
It was centered around freedom and the allowance for the natural progression of freedom and the free market to grow our economy, spread wealth and create a sustainable prosperity for all.
 
The Economic Recovery Tax Act of 1981 was an implementation of that thinking, which reduced tax rates and unleashed one of greatest economic recoveries our nation has ever seen. It eventually brought unemployment down from a high of 10.6% to 5.4% and drastically eliminated inflation. With consumer prices at the highest peacetime rate on record-up 13.3 percent in 1979, three years later, the rate of inflation had slowed considerably, with the Consumer Price Index advancing only 3.8 percent during that same year and from there on throughout the rest of the 80’s and 90’s the actual inflation rate remained well below 5%.
 
That whole process is in stark contrast to the economic recovery acts that we saw our government begin to practice in 2008 and repeat in 2009.
 
Those recovery acts deceptively added the word reinvestment to them and decidedly rejected the successful thinking behind the 1981 measure designed for the same purpose that the most recent bills were.
 
The newestt recovery measures taken were nothing more than a bid for more government and a grab at more centralized government that initiated unfunded mandates and essentially took more money away from the people rather than afford them the chance to keep more of their money.

The modern recovery acts were designed to create more jobs and spur more spending. Yet to date, with less than 10% of the monies slotted for these initiatives spent and the bulk of it not expected to be allocated for years to come, little benefit has actually been seen. And the fact of the matter is that in the end little will be seen.

With only a fraction of the stimulus money having been spent to date, a recent poll determined that 72 percent of Americans want the unused portion of the $787 billion dollar stimulus package returned to taxpayers. They believe it would do more to boost the economy than having the government spend it. That sentiment runs deep through out society as a 59% majority of Democrats, 87% majority of Republicans and 70% majority of independents believe that the money should be returned to taxpayers. This was the same Reagan thinking and policy that allowed for the recovery that we saw in the 80’s.

In all honesty, when you look at a major goal of the recent recovery act, you will see that is the creation of jobs. But the package only creates government jobs. By nature, government jobs do not sustain themselves. They do not create a market which produces a profit that generates a self funding source for themselves. They are funded through taxes. But in addition to the need for a continuous stream of tax dollars to finance these government jobs is the problem that the jobs created by these modern recovery attempts are only temporary.

The work that will be created through the bills are have no enduring future. For instance, once a road is built, it is done. Maintenance for that road will always be required but that alone does not employ the number of workers required to build that road originally.

This is just one example of what may produce a positive effect but will assuredly only be a temporary effect from the most expensive pieces of legislation in history. Ultimately the recent stimulus packages are legislative creations which simply have no long term benefits. But they will have damaging long term effects induced by the ensuing debt that these most recent recovery packages create and the tax burden that their debt will inevitably produce.

Conversely, the recovery act that people like Congressman Jack Kemp and Senator William Roth were responsible for developing was  a stimulus package that allowed for the people to posses more money and it allowed for them to spend more and invest more. All of which energized an entrepreneurial revival that created more self sustaining, permanent jobs and more investment.  All of which spurred a natural cycle of sustainable growth that did not rely on government spending and federal taxation.

28 years later and intermittent failures to acknowledge the success of this thinking at the federal level continues to threaten our economic stability and jeopardizes the freedom based fabric of our American future.

On the day before the anniversary of Ronald Reagan’s signing of the successful recovery measures that we took in 1981, The Center for Fiscal Accountability released it’s annual report which provides evidence to my claim.

The report demonstrated that the average American devotes 224 days of work a year to simply cover the costs of government mandated programs and controls and that the federal government demands approximately 61½ % of our combined national income.

That’s far more than half of what we earn.

The number of days that Americans must work to cover this cost of government allows The Center for Fiscal Accountability to establish what they call Cost of Government Day.  Based on a national average that day for all Americans was August 12th.  That is 26 more days than least year. And it means that when you come down to it, you worked the first 8 months and twelve days of the year to fund the government. 

But if you want an even greater example of just how burdensome and oppressive the crushing costs of government can be, lets take a look at my home state of New Jersey.

While the 2009 national average for the Cost of Government day falls on August 12th, for New Jerseyan’s the Cost of Government Day falls on September 6th, 25 days later than the national date.

One of the state’s few true conservative leaders, State Assemblyman Jay Webber stated that “Since 2002, the average family of four in New Jersey has seen a state tax increase of more than $10,000, a wallop to the wallet by far the worst in the entire nation. The state’s citizens have been saddled with a cumulative tax increase of $21.2 billion from FY2003 to FY2009. We have experienced 108 new or increased taxes in just 8 years—on income, sales, estates, employees, employers, home sales, televisions, phone bills, motor vehicles, tires, and many more items. And that does not even count the state’s record-setting property taxes, which have skyrocketed 54.8 percent since 2002 and amount to $6,500 per household. New Jersey collects more property taxes per capita than any other state.

All of this is a direct result of increased government programs and an increased size of government. It demonstrates that more government is not the answer and that a growing bureaucracy does little to solve problems but much to create more problems and expenses.

But New Jersey is not the state with the latest Cost of Government Day. Connecticut has the latest date, surpassing New Jersey by one day. Behind New Jersey is New York, August 31st (243 days out of the year), followed by California, August 23rd, (235 days) and the fifth worst is Maryland, August 21st, (233 days).

When looking at these states you will find a direct correlation between their overregulation, social engineering programs and high costs of living but you will not find a connection between those characteristics and booming business environments, high employment, government efficiency and a quality of life significantly superior to anywhere else. What that means is that despite all their regulation, government provided services and taxes and fees in these five states, Americans still have no good reason to want to live in them.

In fact in New Jersey it is just the opposite. People are fleeing the Garden State to find jobs, affordable homes and bearable tax rates that will allow them to live comfortably and with a sense of freedom.

All of this makes one wonder whether or not we should really be trying to establish such things as government controlled healthcare. It also makes us question how wise it was to create an economic recovery that throws more and more money into what apparently is responsible for holding the economy and taxpayers back…….government.

The Kemp Roth Economic Recovery Tax Act of 1981 that Ronald Reagan championed, worked twenty eight years ago. It invested in the people and our entrepreneurial spirit. But the so called recovery and reinvestment act of 2009 is far different. It takes money and control away from the people and invests it in government.

The Obama administration may call it “reinvestment” but by all proven standards, I call it a bad investment.

Take a moment to watch the video below of the fateful moment 28 years ago when Ronald Reagan signed the economic recovery package that brought us out of economic despair.  Hear in his own words the keys to its success

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ASSEMBLYMAN WEBBER TO DEBATE ASSEMBLY MAJORITY LEADER

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This weekend will afford New Jerseyans the chance to see our political differences come together in a clash that will pit both sides of the ideological spectrum against each other.

On News 12’s Power & Politics Assemblyman Jay Webber will debate assembly Majority Leader Bonnie Watson Coleman as the two discuss the upcoming state budget and New Jersey’s race for Governor.

The program will air 4 times during the course of the weekend on

News 12:

Saturday at 10:00 a.m. & 3:00 p.m. and Sunday also at 10:00 a.m. & 3:00 p.m.

It is a program that you should definitely try to catch.

Both of these individuals are looked at as potential statewide candidates and both of them represent the ideological bases of their parties.

Our favorite is Assemblyman Jay Webber and after seeing him in action I am sure he will be yours too.

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New Jersey is not known for being home to the most prominent conservative lawmakers and policy makers in the nation but that could soon change.

Right now New Jersey is witnessing a Republican primary for Governor that features probably one of the most conservative candidates to run for governor in any recent race, including the conservative safe havens of the southern United States. That of course is Steve Lonegan. But Lonegan is not alone. In fact he is not the only conservative running for Governor. Assemblyman Richard Merkt is also seeking the G.O.P. nod for governor and he too is pretty far right of center.

Aside from gubernatorial politics, there are some conservatives in New Jersey. In fact many of them flock to an annual event in New jersey called New Jersey Reagan Day. The event is organized by assemblyman and gubernatorial candidate Rich Merkt’s legislative partner in the Assembly, Jay Webber.

Assemblyman Webber is also a conservative. A young conservative who after his first term in the Assembly has shown himself to be a bright light that is leading the way for the conservative movement in New Jersey.

The fact that Merkt and Webber serve together, representing the same district in the state assembly says something in and of itself. It reminds us that there is hope in New Jersey and that there is hope for us to turn things around. If the people of Morris County can elect two conservatives to represent them, the state, as a whole, just might eventually be able to find one to represent and lead it.

That leader just might eventually wind up being Jay Webber.

As a freshman assemblyman, Jay Webber has let no grass grow under his feet.

In his first year in office he adhered to conservative doctrine and applied it to government. He knows that big government leads to big spending and he knows that big spending takes the money out of the pockets of the governed. That is why he has sponsored over a billion dollars worth of tax cuts and it is why he joined with others to find ways to reduce state spending by as much as he would reduce taxes.

However; Assemblyman Webber is not just a fiscal conservative. He understands that our conservative values and principles do not stop after fiscal concerns. That is why he has led the fight to reform Health Care. His legislation focuses on keeping choices available to the people and even increase their options by making it possible to buy insurance across state lines. Aside from making insurance more affordable through greater competition his bill mandates that pre-existing conditions would be covered. That measure would help protect the interests of those most vulnerable and in need of decent health care coverage.

With an eye not only what is happening now, Assemblyman Webber has legislated with an eye on the future as well. Rather than rubber stamping legislative solutions which might be seen as quick fixes, he has opposed such measures as the Highlands Act, forced consolidation, Abbot funding and other unruly state mandated measure that would break the backs of communities and taxpayers.

His legislative initiatives are quite varied and as a primary sponsor those initiative range from exempting military personnel receiving combat zone pay from the gross income tax to opening up the government process and making government more transparent. His legislation demonstrates a belief in people more than government and at 37 and just in his first term in office, Assemblyman Webber is proving himself to be a leader of the conservative cause and a true leader for New Jersey.

Don’t miss him this weekend!

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FLAT TAX FOR NEW JERSEY PROPOSED BY LONEGAN AT REAGAN DAY DINNER

Assemblyman Jay Webber, host and sponsor of New Jersey Reagan Day

Assemblyman Jay Webber, host and sponsor of New Jersey Reagan Day

Bookmark and Share   In a preview of what to expect , during a speech at the annual New Jersey Reagan Day Dinner, Republican gubernatorial candidate Steve Lonegan announced that he will be proposing sweeping reform in the shape of a flat tax for New Jersey.

Lonegan is expected to reveal the details of his proposal at a press conference scheduled for Thursday.

The announcement came during his speech to a crowd of more than 200 people who attended Assemblyman Jay Webber’s 6th Annual New Jersey Reagan Day Dinner in Mountain Lakes, New Jersey on Wednesday.

Guests at the well attended event, did not hear only from Lonegan though.

Also in attendance and scheduled to speak were former federal prosecutor Chris Christie and Franklin Mayor Brian Levine. But Lonegan was the first to take to the podium and he quickly became a hard act to follow.

Invoking the name of Ronald Reagan, Steve Lonegan reminded guests that the current economic woes that we are in are a result of too much government and regarding the recent stimulus package, he stated that “we are witnessing an all out attack on the free market principles which have delivered more prosperity and more opportunity to more human beings than the world has ever seen”.

Lonegan’s brief speech, which accompanies this post, rekindled some of the Reagan era wisdom which showed us that it is big government which is “responsible for shackling taxpayers and stopping us from gaining prosperity”.

As such, Lonegan intends to make New Jersey the battleground for the nations economic recovery and promised to take on the challenge laid out in Ronald Reagan’s first inaugural address when he asked if we have the courage to challenge the immorality of the progressive tax.

Demonstrating his courage, Lonegan announced that in the coming days he will issue detailed economic policies that include scrapping the current state tax code in favor of a fair, equitable flat tax.

Before ending his speech, Lonegan took a swipe at his most formidable rival for the nomination, Chris Christie.

While standing a mere six feet away from each other, Lonegan referred to Christie as his “primary opponent” and accused him of not understanding the Reagan philosophy. He said “my primary opponent, in his opening remarks, when he kicked off his campaign made the following profound statement. “The Wall Street philosophy is responsible for our state’s fiscal ruin” Lonegan continued, “ladies and gentlemen, the Wall Street philosophy is not responsible for our state’s fiscal ruin, that Wall Street philosophy has elevated this nation’s prosperity for two centuries. It is big government that is responsible for our state‘s fiscal ruin”.

After Lonegan made it clear that he believes government is the problem, not the answer, Christie took to the podium and ducked the swipe taken at him by saying, “I am not here tonight to talk about me. Not to talk about the problems with New Jersey. I am here tonight to talk about Ronald Reagan.”

And in an unintended demonstration of overconfidence Christie added, “over the next nine months there will be plenty of time to talk about the rest of the stuff”.

Problem is, if Christie doesn’t win the nomination , he will only have the four months leading up to the June primary to make his case and unlike Lonegan, Chris Chritie has not been making much of case for himself.  A fact not helped by his refusing to discuss any of the issues on this night.  In fact by not addressing any issues he lacked any presentation of the Reagan-like vision that many in the audience appreciate.

Instead, Chris Christie offered a glowing but unmoving tribute to Ronald Reagan that credited Reagan for his unique personality and leadership but left you wondering if Christie really understood the Reagan philosophy. Whereas, Lonegan spoke about Reagan and laid out a vision for New Jersey much like Reagan did for America.

The contrast between the two was startling.

Lonegan left you feeling hopeful and optimistic about change coming our way. Christie just left you wondering.

Last to speak before former assistant to President Reagan and the nights keynote speaker was Franklin Mayor, Brian Levine.

Levine painted a picture of a dreary economic situation and after calling his opponents for the nomination “a good group of colleagues” he headed the audience to understand that any one of the Republican candidates for governor could help bring us out of the economic malaise that the state is in.

Touching on his background as a C.P.A, and a mayor, Levine spoke to his ability to deal with the numbers and create an atmosphere in his township that is more conducive for citizens than the atmosphere Governor Corzine has created for the rest of the state. And in what was perhaps his best line, he quoted Nancy Reagan regarding C.O.A.H., the Council On Affordable Housing.

According to Levine “we need a political leader who will just say no to C.O.A.H.”

C.O.A.H is a state agency which has recently mandated every community in New Jersey to insure a certain percentage of low income housing. The measure will decimate many municipalities and will be a major cause for already skyrocketing property taxes to reach even greater heights.

The appearances and briefs statements from three of the four Republican candidates for Governor merely added to the already special occasion which was as well run as it was well attended.

Emcee and host, Assemblyman Jay Webber provided guests with another successful celebration of the life and legacy of Ronald Reagan and helped to cement the event as a surefire stop on the campaign trail for any and all statewide candidates.

Aside from the gubernatorial candidates, dozens of county leaders, freeholders, mayors and state legislators were also in attendance. Among some of the most prominent included, local conservative assemblyman Michael Patrick Carol, Senate Minority Leader Tom Kean, Jr. and former Jersey City mayor and 2001 Republican gubernatorial nominee Brett Schundler.

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Below you will find videos of the NJ Reagan Day statements made by each of three potential Republican candidates for New Jersey governor who spoke at the event.

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Remarks by Mayor Steve Lonegan
Remarks By Chris Christie
Remarks by Mayor Brian Levine
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“Recession is when your neighbor loses his job. Depression is when you lose yours. And recovery is when Jimmy Carter loses his.”        ~Ronald Reagan

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